Telecom Product Lifecycle – End of Maintenance – End of Support – End of Life

Network planning teams or Engineering Teams in Telecom companies are responsible for Planning and Designing the Networks. It is their job to select new products or upgrade existing deployed equipment in the Network. Telecom equipment is generally very expensive and the planning engineers must be very careful when selecting a product to meet their needs. One major aspect which engineers generally forget or not totally aware of is the Product Life-cycle, and it has also been observed that Vendors also do not inform customers or operators about the product life cycle if not asked specifically.

Point to note is that generally all Telecom products have a life cycle. A product has certain life and it goes through certain upgrade paths before it is declared “End of Life” or out of support. So when you are selecting any product for the Telecom Network make sure the product should at least have 5 to 10 years of life before its vendor discontinues its support. It’s because of the huge cost involved in buying the products. Telecom business plans are majorly impacted by the cost of the equipment used in the Network. So if the planning teams mistakenly select a product which is going to be end of life soon, then of course the company will have to replace the product soon, which will definitely affect the overall Business Plan.

Vendors plan upgrade paths in steps to earn more money and do not provide some features at once. You will have to purchase upgrades i.e. software and hardware both in steps, and planning engineers must be fully aware of these steps which are generally available in Product Road Map documents. If vendors do not provide the information then please ask them to provide in detail so that you properly and cost effectively plan your network life cycle.

Generally vendors do not give visibility of the product roadmaps more than 2 to 3 years ahead. You need to insist on getting roadmaps for next 5 to 10 years.

Don’t forget that you will not get any software or hardware support from the vendors when the product has passed End of Support Dates and there are different solutions available to the problem when your equipment is End of Life. You can ask the vendors for:-

* Extended support
* Buy some spare equipment and run the equipment yourself without support, it’s a bit risky
* Buy support from some third party

Anyhow you will have to purchase new products once they have passed End of Life dates and it has major cost impact on the business plans which must be carefully evaluated and planned.

Hair Health and Common Issues With Styling Products

We wash, style and blow-dry in order to tame our often unruly tendrils. Yet some of the everyday hair care practices we use are actually doing more damage than good. This article takes a look at the issues we face in our efforts to achieve well groomed, shiny and healthy hair.

The average human head has about 100 000 hair follicles and from each one emerges a shaft of hair. Nourished by blood vessels the follicles produce new keratin cells promoting the constant growth of new hair. The inner layer or medulla,

which is protected by the outer keratin cells, contains pigment cells (for colour), fat granules and oxygen. Separate glands run alongside the follicle producing sebum, a natural hair and scalp conditioner. Straight, shiny hair is the result of sebum produced by the glands easily travelling the length of the hair shaft. By contrast, curly hair will often look and feel dry because the sebum has a more difficult time getting from the base of the hair shaft to the tip.

The overall health of the hair depends on numerous factors however nutritional status is key. There are no topically applied hair products that can compensate for poor nutrition. Hair cannot repair itself because it is already dead tissue. However, you can grow healthier hair from the “inside-out”. Healthy hair depends on a constant supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to grow and maintain the look and feel. Any deficiency in key hair nutrients will show up in our skin, hair and nails first, before affecting our internal organs. Therefore, brittle, dry, dull hair that easily breaks may actually be a signifier to check your general nutritional status.

Hair is predominately made up from protein so a deficiency can result in changes to the colour and texture resulting in brittle, weak and thinning hair. Eating protein 3-5 week will help maintain your levels. If you have had a protein deficiency you will notice hair returning to healthy condition within 12 weeks of correcting the deficiency, as the new hairs grow through.

In addition diets high in sugar and animal fats may contribute to poor hair health. An imbalance between good and bad fat consumption can either lead to an overly dry and flaky scalp and dry hair or excessive oil production. Correcting the imbalance will help to normalise the health of the scalp and the relative dryness or oiliness of the hair. High sugar consumption creates a higher demand for B group vitamins, which can also affect hair health. Reducing highly processed and sugar rich foods will not only help hair health, it will also improve general health.

While internal factors affect hair health, external factors also have the potential to damage hair. If you have ever washed your hair with soap you would know that it tends to get tangled and knotty afterwards. The outer “scales” on the hair shaft stand up when in the presence of an alkali, such as soap and get caught up creating a tangled, messy “do”. The scales will lie down flat in the presence of an acid such as lemon juice or vinegar, which is why vinegar hair rinses were traditionally used after washing. While shampoos don’t create this effect they come with their own set of issues as they are stronger cleansers than soap and strip more of the natural oils from the scalp and hair, leaving it dry and in desperate need of moisture. This is where conditioners come in, their key functions to make the hair scales lie back down and coat the hair so that it feels smooth again.

In addition the type of surfactant used to clean hair in shampoos can be problematic with those such as sodium or ammonium lauryl sulphate contributing to irritated and dry scalp and hair issues. Softer surfactants such as decyl glucoside, coco glucoside or coco betaine are better choices for both hair and scalp health.

In general try to avoid conditioners and stying products with added silica as these will just build up on the hair shaft and create “artificially” shiny and silky hair. They will also increase the need to wash hair which in turn dries out hair again, creating a cycle of poor hair management and ultimately, poor hair health.

How often we wash hair is an individual choice however, most people tend to wash their hair too frequently, each time stripping back the protective oils from the scalp and hair. If your scalp is dry or itchy, try waiting one extra day before washing allowing the sebum to protect the scalp for a longer period. Twice weekly for normal to dry hair is a good benchmark. Obviously oily hair needs to be washed more frequently and often daily. Washing hair often entails blow-drying or straightening which if done excessively, damage the hair shaft. The less you dry & straighten, the better your hair condition will tend to be.

Hair styling agents can also impact on the health of the hair and more importantly your general health. In conventional styling products synthetic plastics such as PVP (polyvinyl pyrrolidone polymer), acrylic copolymers, VA (vinyl acetate)polymer and acrylamide polymer are used as holding agents, all of which are synthetic petroleum based plastics. While these may not be specifically damaging to your hair, they are not environmentally friendly and in addition are easily absorbed through the scalp thereby contributing to the total toxic load your body has to deal with. Look instead for natural products such as beeswax or coconut oil based products for strong hold pastes or gels and sugar biopolymer based products from corn or vegetables instead of hair spray or mousse. The natural wax products will also help to keep the hair shaft moisturised. Generally styling products based on such ingredients are healthier for you and for the environment.

What Does a Product Manager Do?

The role of a product manager tends to vary heavily depending on product lifecycle and stage of the company. Due to this variability, there is a wide range of day-to-day activities, but ultimately a product manager is still responsible for doing whatever it takes to collaborate with multiple teams and move different conversations towards closure. Many product managers state that the skill of empathy is one of the most important for a product manager as you need to be able to understand everyone’s motives and make sure that you are collaborating and persuading people to support your decisions.

To provide an example of what I do on a daily basis, below is an agenda of a typical day:

8:30AM: Wake up and check major tech blogs (I work as a PM in the gaming industry) and general news to make sure I’m up to date with the competition and market. Check my Google Doc PM Task List and add/edit any items I need to complete for the day. If I have extra time, I’ll try to complete at least 20-30 minutes of any online course I happen to be taking at the time. It’s important for me to be constantly learning a subject I’m not familiar with to make sure I’m personally growing. I try my best to avoid e-mail until I get into the office or else I end up just spending my valuable morning time responding or cleaning up my inbox.

9:30AM: Head into the office and grab some quick breakfast before getting ready for the daily morning standup with my dev team.

10:00AM: Every day, we run a daily 15 minute team standup, which is generally a standard part of the agile development process. In this meeting, we have a dedicated Project Manager who runs each session and asks 3 key questions 1) What did you work on yesterday? 2) What will you be working on today? 3) Are there any problems hindering you from completing your work?

10:15AM-1:00PM: This work chunk is generally divided by e-mails, quick meetings, and KPI updates. One of the first things I do is update all of my KPI dashboards to make sure metrics aren’t out of whack and everything is running smoothly. Right now, I’m on a fairly new product and a lot of my meetings revolve around discussions for new core features that I help to scope out as well as prioritize in our ever growing product roadmap. We’re rushing to do a global launch on the Android platform so it’s imperative that we shift around all features that can wait until later builds.

1:00PM-1:30PM: Grab a quick lunch with co-workers and generally just hang out. I’m fortunate that my co-workers are also really good friends and we all get along really well.

1:30PM-4:00PM: I spend some time sitting with our sales team (in gaming we call them a live-operations team that handles events and sales within our games) to discuss a new admin tool that our sales team wants our dev team to build. I sync up with the engineering manager to briefly discuss technical requirements and then spend some time wireframing (in PPT, we don’t use anything fancy like Balsamiq) the tool and passing it along to the engineering manager who gets the right dev member to start working on the tool. I also spend a lot of time pulling data to run ad-hoc analyses on recent features that went live as well as dig into why our acquisition rate has been slowly dropping recently.

4:00PM-5:30PM: Meet with Product Marketing to get a sense of what our recent yields have been looking like and to decide whether or not we want to start ramping up marketing spend. We’ve been worried about rising CPI (Cost per Install) lately and wanted to test various ad creatives to see if split testing various ads might lead to lower user acquisition costs. Ultimately, we decide we want to hold off ramping marketing spend for awhile until we can isolate the source of lower yields recently (could be product, market, or marketing related).

5:30PM-6:00PM: Drink with the co-workers in the office and hang out for awhile before heading home for the day.

Although the list above is just one sample day in the life of a product manager, there are definitely set responsibilities that a product manager is always trying to find time to do:

Strategy Planning – As a PM, I always keep a tab of short/mid/long term product feature ideas and it’s extremely important to always be thinking about whether or not these ideas make sense given recent market changes or data analyses that you’ve performed.

Project Management – A good PM is very organized with gathering information from various teams and properly summarizing/documenting the most important information to be shared with appropriate stakeholders. For example, I need to maintain a clean product roadmap with estimated completion times and release dates not just for myself, but also to share with product marketing so that they have a heads up to when they should start working on new campaigns or ad creatives.

Data Analysis – Data is crucial to making well-informed product decisions so PMs should be able to understand and hopefully pull the data they need to run analyses. Learning SQL and Excel are a must to run basic data analysis on the job.

User Testing – It’s imperative to find time to sit down or at least speak with your users so that you can understand their problems and get feedback on what you can improve or create.

New Production Arrangements and Greater Popularization of Science

New arrangements emerging to a new production chain based on applied science. But for that, there is still a need for the greater popularization of the sciences. How much the biosciences profits Loses annually by lack of popularization? Questions like: how much do biosciences lose annually in knowledge, advancement and income because of the lack of popularity? These issues point to the complexity of the production chain that is being aggravated as we move forward in time. An example of the results of the popularization of science is the increase in the action of biohackers and the potential for innovation in this alternative movement. There are already people through DIY Biohackers editing genes through CRISPR and other techniques at alternative sites. Even carrying out high-level research with this popularization of high-level science. We are still in the generation of this movement, with its own methods, concepts and forms of action in a worldwide network, but with actions already well advanced.

In cities, the world outside we see more and more residences and fewer industries, something that is becoming rare to find. Something worrisome in a way, especially for those who need to work. In many cases a phenomenon occurred by real estate speculation, which expels industrial parks to give rise to new models, sometimes sustainable and sometimes not. However, something more trivial and like a bacterium that destroys the inside is ending with more industries than the competition for space. It is the digital issue, which is slowly engulfing industries to new models, a fact that will not be broken down in this article but is already occurring since an ERP to a digital production system present new forms of work that deprived the old ways of working. Making human thinking and reasoning into a chimaera of a deprived craft. And there’s no turning back! Industrial models are languishing to an absurdly incomprehensible efficiency within reach of human capabilities. The question of that automation seen in Japan by microtechnology in the 1970s, 80s, 90s is already obsolete. We are already in a model far beyond that, a model that completely rules out the human being, both in production and in projects. This is a completely aggressive model of production, following the digital and no longer the human question. So, the question of ending industry jobs is a matter of time. And since there are no jobs in industries, things are going to get complicated in the world.

To do so, the only way out is to invest more in complex science, through new arrangements and low-cost methods, in addition to the possibility of outsourcing and renting high-cost methods. That is, relocating the old high-level industry workers to these new arrangements would be a possibility. With the intention of questioning a greater interdisciplinarity in tissue engineering, including bringing this knowledge, its bases, terms and methods to mechanical engineering and chemical grids.

So, everyone must have a high-capacity laboratory with high-cost equipment, instruments and supplies if all of this can go from passive to active, and at a profit. If there is the greater popularization of the sciences, and open access for rent, outsourcing or other business arrangements, that laboratory that only generated costs could be paid. Outsourcing analytical services, partnering with schools, universities, companies and even with researchers, can present new arrangements for a new production matrix that is settling in the world.

In this same line of reasoning was issued an article on the popularization of Biosciences by means of an initial basic method, for people in general interested to start in this branch. The question that was raised would be: Where is Hello World for biosciences? It is also necessary a return to the beginnings of advanced research. In particular the high-efficiency industrialized research ways. As we can see in the brilliant work of Thomas Hager – The Demon Under the Microscope. The remedies since the famous Salvarsan until the highest efficiency of the pharma-chemicals today, there are a lot of details that can be noted in the book. The way those doctors and doctors conducted their research. Like Mr Gerhard Domagk and others.

In most countries, there is a restriction on gene manipulation, however, as there will be progress in this environment if this knowledge is kept indoors and out of reach. Regenerative engineering as a means of taking the world to a new technological level is a historical landmark. The hacker feat in computing is just one example to the extent that we can achieve with the popularization of biosciences. Deregulation and freedom are what brings progress. Securitized environments have proven to be less efficient overall, making it a highly knowledgeable block environment.

How far can we get with the popularization of genetics techniques, biosciences in general, and the cost savings of the necessary materials? This is an issue being exposed by the biohacking movement. We talk about a new oxygenation of old applications, a new brainstorm, much more than applications with PCR, chromatography, physical and chemical techniques in general, and even CRISPR. We talk about the involvement of creativity, logic, computing in this environment, and even other disciplines. In general, generating what does not exist, creating more efficient means to perform tests, apparatus, characterizations and specifications. More efficient and more productive means, things that do not even exist.

One of the themes raised by the author on the issue of the importance of popularizing biosciences involves the issue of the notorious biohacking movement. Although for some it is an “amateur” movement, what could these say about “hackers”, those who have already dismantled highly professional structures in computing? Therefore, the question that the author raises for the popularization of biosciences involves the generation of an initial step, such as Hello World in programming logic. So where is Hello World for biosciences? It would be by popularizing alternative methods, inputs or equipment with KITs, or popularizing PCR, making CRISPR clearer and more accessible, and providing easy access to complete KITs. In addition to providing open access to large laboratories for students and enthusiasts, for high-level equipment. In addition to other possibilities, only the brainstorm gain that will come from this popularization is undeniable. To include, the possibilities of the biohacking movement to gain potential and growth at the level of being compared with the hacker movement of computing. Anyone who doubts, just study what computers were like in the 40s, 50s, 60s, and see real, closed, billions of closed-end laboratories. However, with the popularization, customization and free access to hardware and other advances, the benefits achieved are notorious. The question of DNA and the cataloguing of what each protein performs, in particular by the control of CRISPR are indications that in some decades, biological structures will be highly controlled, and artificial tissues will be mere spare parts. Without a doubt, the advance in the field of biosciences only tends to lose without more popularization.

Jobs with complex and even dangerous means like biology, for the biohacker will be both a challenge and a means of perfecting the skills. Select an agent, a middle and a system, consider the safe means of work with enclosed area. Something like a return to the beginnings of the research, sometimes blind, but with the advantage of having models in the actuality. For this reason, it is recommended to every biohacker to read two primordial works. One Lehninger – principles of biochemistry and the other Thomas Hager – The Demon Under the Microscope. With this initial basis, along with the hacker concepts of action, there is no way that there is not much progress in this environment, in the formation of the first platforms of action for biohacking movements.

This popularization of science will result in new production arrangements for the new economy. They are new concepts of work, including to leverage innovation by alternative means. These new actions of agents outside the official status quo can generate new openings for new economic arrangements, including. One case is the possibility of improvement of new technologies for micro/nanomanufacturing, which may complement the actions by biohacking with nanotechnologies. These new arrangements can bring great potential in a global collaborative network to solve complex problems, with bureaucracies, and especially to circumvent local restrictions on research. The new economy has begun, whether governments want their bureaucracies or not, progress is marching.